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Ridgewood

School

PE

The PE faculty’s vision is ‘To inspire young people to participate and enjoy physical activity’.

Students are encouraged to recognise the importance of an active and healthy lifestyle, and their teachers ensure they have an excellent educational experience in lessons and through extra-curricular activities to ensure that they are very well equipped for the next stage of their education, training or employment. Their vision extends to instilling this through an imaginative and stimulating PE curriculum that provides all students with an outstanding range of opportunities to participate and excel in PE and sport.

Benefiting from nine full time members of staff, our PE faculty teaches students at all key stages. At KS3, students receive four hours of PE over two weeks and are taught as single sex groups in core PE from Year 7 through to Year 11. Students are split by ability and individual needs from Year 8 upwards including some mixed sex groups in Years 9-11. At KS4, students can opt to study the Level 1/2 Cambridge National Certificate in Sport Science. Those students who do not opt to take the Cambridge National still benefit from three hours of core PE over two weeks. At KS5, students can choose to study the Cambridge Technical in Sport and Physical Activity Level 3 (Extended Certificate or Diploma). In order to facilitate PE for students of all ages and abilities, the faculty boasts a gymnasium, a full sized sports hall, a fitness room, three 5-a side football pitches, one 9-a side football pitch, two 11-a side football pitches, one full sized rugby pitch, a 7-a side 3G pitch and 2 netball and tennis courts.

In 2019, students again achieved well in PE, with 44% of grades at Distinction* or Distinction level. In addition to success in the classroom, a dynamic and broad extra-curricular programme is offered. This includes badminton, hockey, basketball,  netball, rugby, rounders, athletics, dance, cheerleading and fitness. At present, girls football is a sport at which Ridgewood excels, with teams winning competitions locally and county-wide. Success has also come in netball and rounders for the girls, and for both girls and boys in athletics, cross country and gymnastics. The faculty are now looking to expand their success into badminton, basketball and rowing in order to promote versatility in competition success. The house system also allows the development of both traditional and non-traditional competitions.

For information about studying PE in the Sixth Form, please visit our Sixth Form course pages.

Core PE 

Overview of topics:

At Key Stage 3, students are taught and assessed in a range of activities which include games such as football, netball, rugby, basketball, badminton, hockey, tennis and rounders. They also complete other activities such as gymnastics, dance, cheerleading, health related fitness, yoga, athletics and orienteering. 

At Key Stage 4, students complete activities similar to those at KS3, but  there is more emphasis on competition, game play and lifelong participation. They are also given the opportunity to complete the Level 2 Sports Leadership Award within their PE lessons.

Assessment:

In KS3, students will be assessed alongside our STEPS assessment and given an age-related performance grade. 
 

The following areas are considered when grading each student.

  • Strand 1: Intellectual understanding
  • Strand 2: Tactics and Understanding – Games, Athletics, Racquet Sports, OAA
  • Strand 3: Analysis and evaluation – Games, Athletics, Dance, Gymnastics, Racquet Sports, OAA
  • Strand 4: Performance and replication - Games, Athletics, Dance, Gymnastics, Racquet Sports, OAA
  • Strand 5: Creativity – Dance, Gymnastics, Games

In Key Stage 4, the main focus is towards engagement and lifelong participation. Students are assessed primarily on their attitude in lessons.

Weighting

25%

75% (top three)

 

Strand 1

Strand 2

Strand 3

Strand 4

Strand 5

Focus

Intellectual understanding

Tactics and strategies

Analysis and evaluation

Performance and replication

Creativity

Sports assessed in

 

All activities

Games

Athletics

Racquet Sports

OAA

Games

Athletics

Dance

Gymnastics

Racquet Sports

OAA

Games

Athletics

Dance

Gymnastics

Racquet Sports

OAA

Dance

Gymnastics

Games

Useful web links:

KS4 

L1/2 Cambridge National Certificate in Sports Science

At KS4, students can opt to study the L1/2 Cambridge National Certificate in Sports Science, which involves five hours of theory and practical teaching over two weeks.

Over the two years students are taught the content required to complete their coursework assignments and pass an external exam which is sat around January time of Year 10 and can be taken again in Year 11 (second chance).

The final grade for the qualification is based on a structure of Distinction* at Level 2 (*2), Distinction at Level 2 (D2), Merit at Level 2 (M2), Pass at Level 2 (P2), Distinction at Level 1 (D1), Merit at Level 1 (M1), Pass at Level 1 (P1) or Not Yet Achieved.

The Cambridge Nationals in Sport Science offer students the opportunity to study key areas of sport science including anatomy and physiology linked to fitness, health, injury and performance; the science of training and application of training principles, and sports nutrition. See below some information about the units we have selected to teach.

Units Assessment Method

Units Assessment Method

%

R041: Reducing the risk of sports injuries

Written paper 1 hour – 60 marks.

25

R042: Applying principles of training

Centre assessed task, OCR moderated.

25

R043: The body’s response to physical activity

Centre assessed task, OCR moderated.

25

R045: Sports nutrition

Centre assessed task, OCR moderated.

25

 

Unit R041: Reducing the Risk of Sports Injuries (Exam)

By completing this unit, learners will know how to prepare participants to take part in physical activity in a way which minimises the risk of injuries occurring, how to react to common injuries that can occur during sport and how to recognise the symptoms of some common medical conditions, providing a good foundation to undertake formal first aid training and qualifications.

  • Students can receive grades from L1 pass to Level 2 Distinction* and will have the opportunity to re-sit the exam if required.

Learning Outcome 1: Understand different factors which influence the risk of injury

Extrinsic factors which can influence the risk of injury, i.e. type of activity (e.g. contact sports present different injury risks from gymnastic activities), coaching/supervision, environmental factors, equipment, safety hazards, i.e.

Intrinsic factors which can influence the risk of injury, physical preparation, individual variables, psychological factors, posture and causes of poor posture and sports injuries related to poor posture.

Learning Outcome 2: Understand how appropriate warm up and cool down routines can help to prevent injury.

The physical benefits of a warm up, the psychological benefits of a warm up, key components of a warm up, physical benefits of a cool down, key components of a cool down, specific needs which a warm up and cool down must consider.

Learning Outcome 3: Know how to respond to injuries within a sporting context

Acute and chronic injuries, types, causes and treatment of common sports injuries, how to respond to injuries and medical conditions in a sporting context, Emergency Action Plans (EAP) in a sporting context

Learning Outcome 4: Know how to respond to common medical conditions

The symptoms of common medical conditions and how to respond to them.

Coursework elements: Students have to complete the exam board assigned scenarios. They will be allowed two hand in’s which must then be marked, improved and then re-submitted.

Unit R042: Applying Principles of Training

By completing this unit, learners will develop knowledge and understanding of the principles and methods of training and the application of these in the design of training programmes along with practical skills in fitness testing.

Learning Outcome 1: Know the principles of training in a sporting context

The principles of training in a sporting context: Progression, specificity, reversibility, moderation and variance.

Learning Outcome 2: Know how training methods target different fitness components

Aerobic and anaerobic exercise, components of fitness and methods of training.

Learning Outcome 3: Be able to conduct fitness tests

Fitness testing and how to interpret the results of fitness tests.

Learning Outcome 4: Be design a fitness training programme

Develop a fitness training programme and evaluate the effectiveness of the training programme.

Unit R043: The Body’s Response to Physical Activity

By completing this unit, learners will understand key aspects of the structure and function of the musculo-skeletal and cardio-respiratory systems and investigate some of the changes which occur to them in response to short and long-term physical activity.

Learning Outcome 1: Know the key components of the musculo-skeletal and cardio-respiratory systems, their functions and roles

Key components of the musculo-skeletal system and its function, key components of cardio-respiratory system and its function, the role of the musculo-skeletal system in producing movement and the role of the cardio-respiratory system during physical activity.

Learning Outcome 2: Understand the importance of the musculo-skeletal and cardio-respiratory systems in health and fitness

The benefits of cardio-respiratory fitness, muscular strength, flexibility and muscular endurance in everyday life.

Learning Outcome 3: Be able to assess the short-term effects of physical activity on the musculo-skeletal and cardio-respiratory systems

Different short-term effects of physical activity on the musculo-skeletal and cardio-respiratory systems, reasons for these and ways to measure and record the short-term effects of physical activity on the musculo-skeletal and cardiorespiratory systems.

Learning Outcome 4: Be able to assess the long-term effects of physical activity on the musculo-skeletal and cardio-respiratory systems

Long-term effects of physical activity on the musculo-skeletal and cardio-respiratory systems, reasons for these and ways to measure and record the long-term effects of physical activity on the musculo-skeletal and cardiorespiratory systems

Unit R045: Sports Nutrition

By completing this unit, learners will consider the composition of a healthy, balanced diet. They will also consider the necessity of certain nutrients in particular quantities and the effects of a poor diet. They will reflect upon the role that diet plays in different sports and activities, and use the knowledge gained to produce an appropriate, effective diet plan for a performer.

Learning Outcome 1: Know about the nutrients needed for a healthy, balanced diet

Characteristics of a balanced diet, what nutrients are, the role of nutrients in a healthy, balanced diet and food sources of nutrients.

Learning Outcome 2: Understand the importance of nutrition in sport

The importance of nutrition before, during and after exercise, the reasons for the varying dietary requirements of different activity types and the use of dietary supplements.

Learning Outcome 3: Know about the effects of a poor diet on sports performance and participation

The definition of malnutrition, the effects of overeating on sports performance and participation, the effects of under eating on sports performance and participation and the effects of dehydration on sports performance and participation.

Learning Outcome 4: Be able to develop diet plans for performers

How to design a diet plan and how to evaluate the effectiveness of the diet plan.

For information about the units in detail see the full version of the specification by OCR. http://ocr.org.uk/qualifications/cambridge-nationals/cambridge-nationals-sport-studies-level-1-2-j803-j813/

Equally, if you have any further queries please do not hesitate to contact a member of the PE department.