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Ridgewood

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Courses

There are 27 courses available to choose from in the Sixth Form from September 2020.

Courses on offer include a wide range of academic A level and Level 3 vocational courses which can be selected to create an appropriate personalised study programme to suit your needs and future aspirations.

Most students will study three A level subjects over the course of Year 12 and 13, but studying four is possible. Students can choose to access a programme of pure linear A levels or Level 3 vocational courses or they may opt to combine linear A levels with Level 3 vocational qualifications.

Students will be given personalised advice in their one-to-one course placement meeting so they can make the right decisions about their most suitable pathway.

Please note: This page is currently being updated with details of all the courses available for study from 2020.

All courses listed are subject to sufficient student numbers in order to make it possible to run them and courses may need to be withdrawn if the numbers of students wishing to undertake the course mean it is not viable.

Applied Science

Pearson BTEC National Diploma in Applied Science

Why study Applied Science at The Sixth Form at Ridgewood?

  • Explore the fundamental nature of almost everything that we know of. 
  • Study all three sciences in detail; get a deeper understanding of the world around you, and yourself. Start your journey into a world deep beneath the surface of what you can actually see.
  • Study in three specialist post-16 laboratories in Faraday where the majority of teaching takes place, one for each of Biology, Chemistry and Physics. All our labs are highly resourced with practical equipment you will use frequently during your studies.
  • One of our largest departments, the Science team boasts ten teachers and three technicians. Within this team we have highly qualified teachers in all three specialisms. Their backgrounds and expertise cover a wide breadth of areas including engineering, applied chemistry and biological sciences.
  • Former alumni of the science department at Ridgewood have progressed to study medicine, astrophysics, radiography, physics, mathematics, mechanical engineering, chemical engineering, computer science, chemistry, bio-medical science and aeronautical engineering.

What topics will I study in this subject?

Topic

What this means

Unit 1: Principles and applications of science

All scientists and technicians need to understand the core science subjects and principles; these are the topics you will be focusing on during this unit

  • Chemistry: Structure and bonding in science applications
  • Biology: Structure and function of cells
  • Physics: waves and how we use them for communication.

Unit 2: Practical scientific procedures and techniques

In this unit you will continue with the content you have experienced in Unit 1; however, you will focus more or the practical application of this new knowledge. You will do this by undertaking three main experiments, one for each of the specialisms, and produce a report on each

  • Chemistry: Titrations and calorimetry
  • Biology: Chromatograms
  • Physics: Cooling curves.

Unit 3: Science investigation skills

This unit will consist of you planning and carrying out your own investigations based upon a topic presented to you from Edexcel.

Optional module

This optional module will be decided upon based upon the interests of the group. A list of module titles is given below

  • Physiology of human body systems
  • Human regulation and reproduction
  • Biological molecules and metabolic pathways
  • Genetics and genetic engineering
  • Diseases and infections
  • Applications of organic chemistry
  • Applications of inorganic chemistry
  • Electrical circuits and their applications
  • Astronomy and space science

What skills will I need in this subject?

Skill

What this skill involves in this subject

AO1 – recall/ remember facts

Demonstrate knowledge of scientific fact, definitions of terms, and scientific formulae.

Command words: give, label, name, state.

A02 – application of facts

Demonstrate understanding of scientific concepts, procedures, processes and techniques and their application.

Command words: calculate, compare, discuss, draw, explain, state, write.

A03 – Scientific principles and interpreting information

Analyse, interpret and evaluate scientific information to make judgements and reach conclusions.

Command words: calculate, compare, comment, complete, describe, discuss, explain, state.

AO4 – Making connections between scientific principles

Make connections, use and integrate different scientific concepts, procedures, processes or techniques.

Command words: compare, comment, discuss, explain.

What will my lessons involve?

  • Applied Science is taught by three separate science teachers: a specialist in each of biology, chemistry and physics.
  • Applied Science lessons will contain a variety of different tasks to suit all learners’ needs. Examples of activities in lessons include fact recall quizzes on A01 content, hands-on practicals in order to complete the practical aspects of the course, and paired discussions around higher level thinking. We also focus heavily on teacher-led worked examples and model answers.
  • 75% of the course is coursework and therefore a large proportion of lessons will be completing coursework and practical aspects of the course.
  • We also strive to give you regular written feedback on classwork so that you know exactly how to improve and achieve a better grade.

 What will my independent study involve?

  • A significant factor in your success at post-16 is the quality of your independent study work. Independent study for Applied Science will largely consist of making revision resources and answering questions, and completing coursework.
  • We expect you to spend nine hours over two weeks completing high quality independent study for this course.
  • A portion of your independent study will also consist of conducting research by searching online, in text books or revision guides. This could either involve finding practical methods to conduct in the class or researching content prior to lessons.
  • It is important for you to reflect regularly on your strengths and areas for development and make improvements to these. The most successful Applied Science students are the ones who do this the most by completing additional notes and questions on areas for development.
  • You will also be spending a large proportion of your time completing coursework and redrafting work to hand to your separate biology, chemistry and physics teachers.

How will I be assessed?

Percentage exam assessment: 25%

Percentage coursework assessment: 75%

Assessment

Details of assessment

Unit 1 Assessment

This will be assessed through three 40 minute examinations. Each one will focus on a particular specialism.

It will take place in the summer of year one of the course.

It is worth 25% of your overall grade.

Unit 2 Assessment

A coursework portfolio of practicals will be built up throughout this module and then submitted to the examination board.

This coursework will be built up throughout both years an submitted at the end of your second year.

It is worth 25% of your overall grade.

Unit 3 Assessment

You will be assessed through a piece of timed coursework with an examination component that will be performed in the classroom and then submitted to examination board.

This will be completed in the summer of year one of the course.

It is worth 33% of your overall grade.

Option module Assessment

This piece of coursework is based upon a practical that you will perform in class and then submitted to the examination board.

This coursework will be built up throughout your second year and submitted in summer.

It is worth 17% of your overall grade.

How do I know this is the right course for me?

  • Studying Applied Science is not only interesting and challenging. It also opens up many future career possibilities as it offers an alternative pathway into a career in science.
  • At the end of this course you will receive UCAS points; these can be used at many universities as entry points. However it is important that you check to ensure the university course you wish to apply for accepts UCAS points as some do not.
  • The content follows on from the GCSE science, but the demands and skill level are higher. Therefore you have to be willing to dedicate your time to developing these. 
  • There are many practicals and subsequent lab reports to write; these all contribute to you overall final grade. This is better suited to people who don’t always perform well on written examinations.

Art, Craft and Design

AQA A Level Art, Craft and Design

Why study Art, Craft & Design at The Sixth Form at Ridgewood?

  • The subject knowledge of the staff allows you to unlock your unrealised potential.
  • Access purpose built modern facilities with space to fulfil most students’ ideas, however big they are!
  • You will work with trust in your teachers at every step of your studies.
  • Bespoke one-to-one intervention takes place for every student in every lesson through questioning, coaching and discussion.
  • Your love of the subject is matched by the passion of our staff.

What topics will I study in this subject?

Topic

What this means

Year 12: Bare Bones

 

Minimal

Ten Plus One, Plus Another One

Gluttony

Mock examination

An introductory project covering new and old techniques demonstrating the ‘step up’ to A level.

‘Less is more’, successful use of limited shape colour and pattern. Careful composition and dynamic typography.

Unusual starting points for the generation of a final outcome.

Exploring excess through fine art, photography and digital media.

Mock examination (ten hours) based on the work generated for ‘Gluttony’.

Year 13: Personal Project
 

Externally Set Examination

A self-set project spanning five months. Evidence to fulfil the assessment objectives is generated and collated through guidance from staff. This culminates in a final piece or pieces.

Like the GCSE examination, a range of starting points will be presented to you, set by the exam board.  You will select one and investigate ideas, culminating in a 15 hour examination.

What skills will I need in this subject?

Skill

What this skill involves in this subject

Craftsmanship

You should have a good sense of aesthetic (the way things look) coupled with confident technical ability. This and an added willingness to explore new ways of working will help you develop significantly as an art student at Ridgewood.

Independent thought and study

You will often be required to explore practitioners’ work by yourself, continue with ideas and creative work you may have started in your lesson, and show progress in your next lesson. Confidence in your own ideas is paramount.

Time management

 

Art involves a lot of ‘doing’, it is not a subject you can do well in if you simply turn up to the lesson. You will need to balance your other subjects and independent study, so you can ensure you complete the work set for Art to an expected standard.

 What will my lessons involve?

  • Interesting and stimulating briefs to challenge and develop skills.
  • One-to-one discussions to aid idea and portfolio development.
  • Explore overlapping areas of Art, Craft and Design including painting, drawing, sculpture, textiles, surface pattern, print making, interactive media, advertising, packaging design, design for print, illustration, branding and photography.
  • Lessons may involve listening, researching, annotation, discussion (group and individual) as well as creative ‘on task’ activities.

What will my independent study involve?

  • It will involve following next step advice from your teacher and you will be expected to show progress in your next timetabled lesson.
  • You should use the Learning Resource Centre for further reading or research.
  • You can use the Art studio in Faraday to further develop practical work following guidance from your teacher.
  • Your independent study periods will be shared evenly between Art and your other subjects and will be added to your timetable on SIMS.

How will I be assessed?

Percentage exam assessment:  40%

Percentage coursework assessment:  60%

Assessment

Details of assessment

Examination paper in Year 13 is 40%

  • One exam, 15 hours, worth 40% of overall mark
  • An externally set exam is distributed in February of Year 13 and you will have approximately two months to prepare investigations, ideas and experimentations etc. before sitting the 15 hour examination where you will create the final piece. 

How do I know this is the right course for me?

  • A level Art is time consuming, challenging and frustrating but arguably the most rewarding course available. You will work hard but will create some fantastic work and develop as an artist ready for your future pathway.
  • The step up from GCSE is not obvious, but generally you’ll be required to do as much work in one week as you did in two weeks at GCSE. Through guidance, your work will become more mature and sophisticated, but you must be willing to stretch your own understanding of the subject too.
  • Current students enjoy the breadth of opportunities available to them in realising their ideas.
  • You can help your success by spending a little time EVERY day adding to your work, looking on specific websites/image research apps and by DRAWING. This will enrich your knowledge and skills, and ultimately make your work significantly stronger and more mature. 

Biology

AQA A Level Biology

Why study Biology at The Sixth Form at Ridgewood?

  • Studying Biology A level will enable you to look more closely at the biochemistry, genetics and evolution of a range of organisms. Biology literally means ‘the study of life’ and if that’s not important, what is?
  • Being such a broad subject, you’re bound to find a specific area of interest, plus it opens the door to a fantastic range of interesting careers.
  • One of our largest departments, the Science team boasts ten teachers and three technicians. Within this, Biology is our biggest team of specialist teachers. Their interests range from biochemistry to genetics and inheritance, so whatever your passion there will be someone in our team who shares it!
  • We have three specialist post-16 laboratories in Faraday where the majority of teaching takes place, one for each of Biology, Chemistry and Physics.
  • During your studies on the Biology course at Ridgewood, you will get to carry out a variety of practical activities including glucose calibration, heart dissections and gel electrophoresis.
  • Former alumni of the Biology department at Ridgewood have progressed to study medicine, biomedical science, radiography, zoology, pharmacology, biochemistry, neuroscience and dentistry.

What topics will I study in this subject?

Topic

What this means

Biological molecules

Explore the fundamental building blocks of organisms – the molecules of which their cells are composed.

Cells

Cells are the fundamental unit of life. Cells have certain basic features and yet show remarkable diversity in both structure and function. Within this module you will discuss the structure of the plasma membrane and the passage of substances across it by passive and active transport.

Organism exchange substances with their environment

All cells and organisms exchange material between themselves and their environment. In this unit you will discuss single celled organisms, insects, plants and mammals.

Genetic information and variation

Look at DNA, mRNA and tRNA. You will discuss how each molecule is used in protein synthesis and will also focus on the diverse range of species and how to classify different organisms.

Energy transfers in and between organisms

Organisms require a constant input of energy to maintain their highly ordered structures and systems. Within this module you will discuss how ATP is produced in photosynthesis and respiration. You also discuss nutrient cycles and how nitrogen and phosphorus are recycled.

Organisms respond to changes in their environments

There are two forms of coordination in most multicellular animals – nervous and hormonal. Within this module you will look at both in detail to explain how drugs and diseases affect the nervous and hormonal system.

Genetics, populations, evolution and ecosystems

Individuals of a species share the same genes but usually have different combinations of alleles of these genes. An individual inherits alleles from their parent or parents; this process is universal. However, the way in which the alleles interact to produce new characteristics of the new individual depends on the type of inheritance involved. Within this module you will investigate different methods of inheritance, genetic diagrams, natural selection and disease.

The control of gene expression

At a cellular level, control of metabolic activities is achieved by regulating which genes of the genome are transcribed and translated, and when this takes place. Within this module you will discuss how the environment has an effect on our genome as well as how cancer is caused and regulated.

What skills will I need in this subject?

Skill

What this skill involves in this subject

AO1 –Recall/ remember facts

You should be able to recall and remember knowledge and understanding taught in lessons of scientific ideas, processes, techniques and procedures. For example, you may be asked to describe the sequence of a scientific process or describe a method that could be used to obtain reliable results.

A02 – Application of knowledge

Apply knowledge and understanding of scientific ideas, processes, techniques and procedures. This may be when discussing a theory, in a practical context or when handling both qualitative and quantitative data. This assessment objective often asks you to apply your knowledge and understanding of a topic to an unfamiliar scenario.

A03 – Scientific principles

Analyse, interpret and evaluate scientific information, ideas and evidence. This assessment objective assesses whether you can use scientific principles to form conclusions and judgements using information that is given or may need to be processed. You may also need to adapt methods for practical investigations to acquire more reliable results.

What will my lessons involve?

Biology lessons at Ridgewood will contain a variety of different tasks to suit all learners’ needs. Examples of activities you will undertake include:

  • Fact recall quizzes
  • Hands on practical activities
  • Paired discussions
  • Group work
  • Research tasks
  • Teacher-led worked examples
  • Teacher-led lecture style delivery of content
  • Exam question practice and guidance through this
  • Opportunity to ask questions.

We also strive to give you regular written feedback on classwork so that you know exactly how to improve and achieve a better grade.

What will my independent study involve?

For every hour you spend in a Biology lesson, one hour of independent study is expected. This may take the form of:

  • Cornell notes
  • Flash cards
  • Exam questions
  • Essay prep
  • Retrieval grids
  • Researching practical activities
  • Researching content prior to the lesson it is to be taught
  • Responding to your teacher’s marking and feedback.

You are expected to complete extra reading to help support your writing of the essay in Paper 3.

How will I be assessed?

Percentage exam assessment: 100%

Percentage coursework assessment: 0%

Assessment

Details of assessment

Paper 1

Any content from topics 1-4, including relevant practical skills. It is a written exam worth 91 marks. 76 marks are gained from a mixture of long and short answer questions, 15 marks are gained from extended response questions.

Paper 1 is worth 35% of your overall A level grade. This exam is two hours long.

Paper 2

Any content from topics 5-8, including relevant practical skills. It is a written exam worth 91 marks. 76 marks are gained from a mixture of long and short answer questions, 15 marks are gained from comprehension questions.

Paper 2 is worth 35% of your overall A level grade. This exam is two hours long.

Paper 3

Any content from topics 1-8, including relevant practical skills. It is a written exam worth 78 marks. 38 marks are gained from structured questions, including practical techniques; 15 marks are gained from critical analysis of given experimental data; 25 marks are gained from one essay from a choice of two titles.

Paper 3 is worth 30% of your overall A level grade. This exam is two hours long.

How do I know this is the right course for me?

  • A level Biology is a challenging and enjoyable A level. The demands of the course are high and the progression from GCSE to A level is very difficult. However, those students who are motivated and determined relish this opportunity and have achieved their full potential.
  • Courses which work well with Biology include Maths, Chemistry, Physics, Psychology and Sociology.
  • Current students say:
  • “A level Biology is interesting, but it is much more difficult than GCSE. Lots of people find it easier at GCSE and therefore choose to take it but you need to invest time in it to do well”
  • “A level Biology opens up so many doors to different careers”
  • “If I could re-do Year 12, I would tell myself to be more organised and use my independent study time more wisely, then I would have found my exams in summer more manageable”

Business

OCR Cambridge Technicals Level 3 Extended Certificate in Business

Why study Business at The Sixth Form at Ridgewood?

What topics will I study in this subject?

Topic

What this means

Unit 1 – The Business Environment

 

In this unit you will develop an understanding of how and why businesses operate in the way they do. You will look at a range of different types of business structures, ownership of a business and its objectives, different functions within a business, legal, financial, ethical and other resource constraints. You will explore ways in which businesses respond to changes in their economic, social and technological environment and you will learn how to assess business performance.

Unit 2 – Working in Business

This unit will cover the skills and understanding needed to work effectively within a business environment. This includes arranging meetings, working with business documents, making payments, prioritising business activities and communicating with stakeholders. These are tasks that are common to almost all job roles.

Unit 4 – Customers and Communication

In this unit you will learn the purpose, methods and importance of communication in business and the appropriateness of different forms of communication for different situations and different groups of customers.

Unit 5 – Marketing and Market Research

In this unit you will gain an in-depth understanding of primary and secondary market research methods used to inform marketing decision-making and the constraints on marketing activities.

Unit 19 – International Business

In this unit, you will gain an understanding of key decisions that businesses must make when deciding whether to operate internationally. This unit will provide you with practical experience which will be valuable should you wish to undertake further study in this area or follow a career in a business.

What skills will I need in this subject?

Skill

What this skill involves in this subject

Research

Throughout the two year course you will be expected to conduct your own independent research into businesses and how they work.

Timekeeping

You will complete three coursework units, so you need to be able to use your time well and meet deadlines.

Business awareness

You will need to keep up to date with business news and be able to implement it within your work to show thorough understanding of how businesses work in the modern day.

Communication

This covers verbal and written communication, and listening. It's about being clear, concise and focused; being able to tailor your message for the audience and listening to the views of others as you will have to present information clearly throughout your course.

What will my lessons involve?

  • During both years of the course your lessons will be split 50-50 between being focused on the exam units and the coursework units.
  • You will be tested in mock exams throughout the year to prepare you for these.
  • Most exam lessons involve explanation and discussion of a new concept, followed by further research of the topic and real world uses and applications, then practice questions on that concept.
  • During coursework lessons, you will be introduced to a new topic and problem and then a number of your lessons will be for you to independently work on your coursework units with guidance from your teachers.

What will my independent study involve?

  • You will be given regular work to do; this could involve research of an area or a new topic, or practice questions or mini projects.
  • You will need to spend considerable time checking over your notes to ensure you understand the content.
  • During both years you will need to spend most of your time working on your coursework.
  • Finally, you will need to spend time doing exam practice and getting familiar with the mark schemes and questions.

How will I be assessed?

Percentage exam assessment: 50%

Percentage coursework assessment: 50%

Assessment

Details of assessment

Unit 1 – The Business Environment

Exam – Two hours (90 marks) – 33% of overall mark

Section A: Multiple choice on any aspect of the unit (20 marks)

Section B: 4 – 6 mark questions about businesses you have researched (20 marks)

Section C: Extended, evaluative writing questions (50 marks)

Unit 4 – Customers and Communication

Coursework – 17% of overall mark

10 Pass tasks, 4 Merit tasks, 2 Distinction tasks

Unit 2 – Working in Business

Exam – 1 hour 30 minutes (60 marks) – 17% of overall mark

Four questions based around a case study and a given scenario. This will include one extended, evaluative writing question.

Unit 5 – Marketing and Market Research

Coursework – 17% of overall mark

8 Pass tasks, 3 Merit tasks, 2 Distinction tasks

Unit 19 – International Business

Coursework – 17% of overall mark

9 Pass tasks, 3 Merit tasks, 2 Distinction tasks

How do I know this is the right course for me?

  • If you are considering this course, you will need to be able to write extended, evaluative pieces of writing.
  • In addition to this, you will also need to be able to learn a vast amount of business terminology and be able to apply mathematical formula to analyse business performance.
  • If you have previously studied Business, you will have a good idea of what you can expect on this course. 

Chemistry

AQA A Level Chemistry

Why study Chemistry at The Sixth Form at Ridgewood?

  • A level Chemistry attempts to answer the big question ‘What is the world made of?’ and it’s the search for this answer that makes this subject so fascinating.
  • From investigating how one substance can be changed drastically into another, to researching a new wonder drug to save millions of lives, the opportunities that chemistry provides are endless.
  • One of our largest departments, the Science team boasts ten teachers and three technicians. Within this team we have three highly qualified specialist Chemistry teachers, whose passion and expertise for their subject is contagious.
  • We have three specialist post-16 laboratories in Faraday where the majority of teaching takes place, one for each of Biology, Chemistry and Physics.
  • Since the A level reform we have highly resourced the practical aspect of the course, and we have equipment in school to complete a wealth of hands-on practicals including making aspirin!
  • Former alumni of the Chemistry department at Ridgewood have progressed to study medicine, dentistry, chemistry, biomedical science, pharmacology, biochemistry, engineering, mathematics, chemical engineering and law.

What topics will I study in this subject?

Topic

What this means

Organic Chemistry

You will explore the properties and reactions of different groups of chemicals, learning how to name, draw and show the reactions they undergo using IUPAC notation. You will study in depth common organic molecules and the interconversions between these; for example, you will study how anti-cancer drugs work and how aspirin is synthesised. Spectroscopic techniques used to identify these different molecules are covered in theoretical and practical contexts. This will culminate in several Required Practical activities where you will research, plan and execute investigations to demonstrate the concepts covered and your new knowledge.

Physical Chemistry

You will study a range of physical properties of chemicals such as atomic structure and the nature of different chemical bonds. This module also contains most of the calculations on the course including amount of substance calculations where you will learn how to calculate the mass, volume, concentration, pressure and amount in moles of different chemical reactions. The industrial applications of rates of reaction and chemical equilibrium are explored in detail as well as more complex thermodynamic considerations. Physical Chemistry contains 6 of the 12 required practicals but the skills and calculations you learn during this module will link to just about every other chemistry topic!

Inorganic Chemistry

You will explore the properties and trends of group 2, group 7 and period 3 of the periodic table. As well as this you will investigate the transition metals in more detail. You will carry out experiments to explore the reactions of transition metal ions with simple compounds to form coloured complexes and explain the origins of this colour. You will also explain how and why transition metals are used as catalysts in chemical reactions.

What skills will I need in this subject?

Skill

What this skill involves in this subject

AO1 – Recall/ remember facts

You should be able to recall and remember knowledge and understanding taught in lessons of scientific ideas, processes, techniques and procedures. For example, you may be asked to describe the sequence of a scientific process or describe method that could be used to obtain reliable results.

A02 – Application of knowledge

Apply knowledge and understanding of scientific ideas, processes, techniques and procedures. This may be when discussing a theory, in a practical context or when handling both qualitative and quantitative data. This assessment objective often asks you to apply your knowledge and understanding of a topic to an unfamiliar scenario.

A03 – Scientific principles

Analyse, interpret and evaluate scientific information, ideas and evidence. This assessment objective assesses whether you can use scientific principles to form conclusions and judgements using information that is given or may need to be processed. You may also need to adapt methods for practical investigations to acquire more reliable results.

What will my lessons involve?

  • Your lessons will include a variety of different tasks to suit all learners. However, since this course contains a lot of content, some of the lessons will be traditional teacher-led lecture style lessons, followed by application of the content.
  • In all lessons there will be the opportunity to reflect on your knowledge and understanding either individually, with the help of a peer, or in response to teacher feedback.
  • The course contains a stand-alone practical qualification so there will be lots of opportunities to conduct hands-on practical activities.
  • Since this is a linear course with three exams at the end of it, retrieval practice in the form of fact recall quizzes will be completed regularly to help your retention of knowledge.
  • Teacher-led worked examples and guidance on exam technique will be embedded into lessons to help you achieve the best grade possible.
  • We know most students learn best by having the opportunity to discuss learning either with peers or with a teacher, so there will be regular opportunities to ask questions and work in groups.

What will my independent study involve?

  •  A significant factor in your success at A level is the quality of your independent study work. This will largely consist of making revision resources and answering questions.
  • We expect you to spend nine hours over two weeks completing high quality independent study for this course.
  • By the end of the course our top achieving students will have completed past exam questions several times.
  • A portion of your independent study will also consist of conducting research by searching online, in text books or revision guides. This could be either finding practical methods to conduct in class or researching content prior to lessons.
  • As this is a linear course, retrieval practice is essential to achieve the best grades. This involves testing yourself on prior learning frequently and revisiting previous topics.
  • It is important for you to regularly reflect on your strengths and areas for development and make improvements to these. The most successful students are the ones who do this the most by completing additional notes and questions on areas for development. Practice makes perfect! 

How will I be assessed?

Percentage exam assessment: 100%

Percentage coursework assessment: 0%

Assessment

Details of assessment

Paper 1

Two hour written exam based around physical and inorganic chemistry. This involves answering traditional long and short style questions.

It is worth 105 marks and counts for 35% of your A level.

Paper 2

Two hour written exam based around physical and organic chemistry. This involves answering traditional long and short style questions.

It is worth 105 marks and counts for 35% of your A level.

Paper 3

Two hour written exam that assesses any content and has a large focus on practical skills. This is worth 90 marks and 30% of your A level.

It includes 40 marks from question focusing on practical techniques, 20 marks from questions testing knowledge from across the specification, and 30 marks from multiple choice questions.

How do I know this is the right course for me?

  • Studying A level Chemistry is not only interesting and challenging. It also opens up many future career possibilities as it contains strong links with the other sciences, maths and engineering.
  • The content follows on nicely from the GCSE Chemistry course but the demands and skill level are a lot higher, therefore you have to be willing to dedicate your time to developing these. 
  • There are a lot more calculations required in A level Chemistry in comparison to GCSE so you must enjoy solving numerical problems and algebraic rearrangements.

What our students say:

  • “At GCSE you are taught about chemical reactions that these reactants make these products. During A level you learn why this happens. This is what I find the most fascinating about the course.”
  • “I found the demands of the course hard to cope with at first because it is quite different from GCSE, but the teachers are really supportive and helped me to structure my independent study time more effectively so that I could progress.”

Computer Science

OCR A Level Computer Science

Why study Computer Science at The Sixth Form at Ridgewood?

  • A level Computer Science is rapidly becoming one of the most sought after qualifications in the world, and proves hugely popular with the best universities across the globe.
  • Studying it at Ridgewood Sixth Form will provide you with the very best foundations for the beginning of your computer science journey, whether that’s to progress to university, or jump straight into a career.
  • At Ridgewood, we strive to ensure you will enjoy each and every lesson in Computing.
  • A particular strength of the course at Ridgewood is the wealth of subject knowledge your teachers possess.
  • With a team of highly qualified staff who teach parts of the course matching their speciality areas, you will receive outstanding tuition across all aspects of the course.

What topics will I study in this subject?

Topic

What this means

Unit 1 Computer Systems

This unit contains the most content and mainly looks at hardware and software.

The topic also looks at different data types, data structures and algorithms, and legal, moral, cultural and ethical issues related to computers.

Unit 2 Algorithms and Programming

This unit is mainly about programming. It involves learning the different types of computational thinking and problem-solving methods and gives you an introduction into programming and learning and using algorithms to solve problems.

Unit 3 Programming Project

You will choose a computing problem to work through. You will analyse the possible solutions to the problem, design a solution, develop a solution and then evaluate your work.

What skills will I need in this subject?

Skill

What this skill involves in this subject

Problem solving

This could involve breaking down a complex problem into smaller problems or working out which algorithm to use to solve a problem.

Programming

You will be encouraged to learn new programming languages as well as engaging with your coding skills to undertake real world challenges to fully prepare you for the exams as well as industry careers.

Evaluation

You will need to see both sides of an argument and be able to suggest reasons why something might not happen the way it should.

What will my lessons involve?

  • Half of lesson time will be focused on the two exam units. You will be tested in mock exams throughout the year to prepare you for these.
  • During Year 13, a number of your lessons will be for you to work independently on your programming project.
  • Most lessons involve explanation and discussion of a new concept, followed by practice questions on that concept.
  • You will have lessons during Year 12 where you will be taught programming languages and more lessons practising these skills.

What will my independent study involve?

  • You will be given regular work to do; this could involve researching an area or a new topic, or practice questions or mini projects
  • You will need to spend considerable time checking over your notes to ensure you understand the content.
  • During Year 13, you will need to spend most of your time working on your programing project. This will mostly be completed out of lesson, including the writing up of the four sections.
  • Finally, you will need to spend time doing exam practice and becoming familiar with the mark schemes and questions.

How will I be assessed?

Percentage exam assessment: 80%

Percentage coursework assessment: 20%

Assessment

Details of assessment

Paper 1

 

2 hour 30 minute exam, 140 marks, 40% of overall mark

Computer Systems

Mostly short answer questions with some longer 9 and 12 mark questions

Paper 2

2 hour 30 minute exam, 140 marks, 40% of overall mark

Algorithms and programming

Mostly short answer questions with some longer 9 mark questions

Programming Project

Coursework, 70 marks, 20% of the exam

Students will be expected to analyse a problem (10 marks), and design (15 marks), develop and test (25 marks), and evaluate and document (20 marks) a program. The program must be to solve it written in a suitable programming language.

How do I know this is the right course for me?

  • If you have previously studied Computer Science, you will have a good idea of what you can expect at A level.
  • The Computer Science A level is streamlined to directly develop what you have covered in Computer Science at GCSE.
  • We will start by refreshing your knowledge of the basics of the GCSE content and ensuring you are confident, before delving deeper to cover the A level specification.
  • If you are interested in programming or learning how to program, this course will be for you.
  • If you enjoyed Computer Science at GCSE, and have an interest in developing your knowledge and understanding further, then A level Computer Science is absolutely for you.

Construction and the Built Environment

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Certificate in Construction and the Built Environment

Why study Construction and the Built Environment at The Sixth Form at Ridgewood?

What will I study in this subject?

Unit

Title

Content

1

Construction Principles

Learners will develop an understanding of the underlying principles used in the design, construction and refurbishment of buildings and infrastructure.  We will cover construction materials, processes, effects of temperature and the behaviour of materials under load, solving practical construction problems and human comfort.

2

Construction Design

Learners will apply the principles and practice of design and construction for low and medium rise buildings and structures. We will cover the design process, building design production, construction methods and techniques and sustainability.

4

Construction Technology

Learners will examine the underlying principles and construction methods using in the construction of buildings and their associated external works. We will cover forms of low rise construction, foundation design, superstructure design and external works.

5

Health and Safety in Construction

Learners will carry out a safe system of work and investigate the significance of safety system reviews including the responsibility of employees and employers.

We will cover health and safety legislation, the development of a safe system of work for construction operations and understanding the need for the review of safety systems. 

What will my lessons and independent study involve?

  • Lessons are delivered in a number of different ways to ensure students get a great experience.
  • This course involves theoretical study and is not a practical course.
  • Independent study outside lessons may involve research, group presentations, writing up lesson notes using Cornell notes, creating revision resources, self quizzing, past papers and completion of assignment work. 

How will I be assessed?

Unit

Title

Type

1

Construction Principles

External Assessment

Written Exam – 1 hours 30 minutes

75 marks

2

Construction Design

Synoptic Assessment

Task set and marked by Pearson

Completed under supervised conditions

12 hours in a two week period set by Pearson

4

Construction Technology

Internal Assessment – 3 written assignments

5

Health and Safety in Construction

Internal Assessment – 3 written assignments

Is this the right course for me?

To be successful, you must be a strong independent learner who can analyse and decimate written and numerical information accurately. You need to relish the challenges of researching, conducting and analysing data, and enjoy working collaboratively. If you are keen to broaden your knowledge of construction at a technical or professional level, or are interested in studying a construction related degree at university, this course will suit you.

Economics

Edexcel A Level Economics

Why study Economics at The Sixth Form at Ridgewood?

What will I study in this subject?

There are four themes covered in Year 12 and Year 13

  • 1: Competitive Markets (Y12) looks at the basics, Demand and Supply and Market Failure.
  • 2: Managing the Economy (Y12) looks at the UK Economy and government.
  • 3: Business Economics and Economic Efficiency (Y13) looks at competition and firms.
  • 4: The Global Economy (Y13) looks at Globalisation, Trade, Development and Poverty.

What will my lessons and independent study involve?

  • Lessons involve a mix of taught content, group discussion, answering practice questions and investigating case studies.
  • Independent learning involves exam practice, further reading, and staying up to date with current affairs by watching/reading/listening to the news on a regular basis.

How will I be assessed?

  • The course is 100% exam, with 3 exams sat in June of Y13.
  • Papers are a mix of multiple choice questions, data questions and essay questions.
  • Paper 1: 2 hours. Questions on Theme 1 and 3. 35% of marks.
  • Paper 2: 2 hours. Questions on Theme 2 and 4. 35% of marks.
  • Paper 3: 2 hours. Questions on all 4 Themes. 30% of marks

Is this the right course for me?

  • Prior knowledge of Economics is not needed to study the course but you will need to be able to write essay-style questions in exams, so English is very important.
  • It links well with Government and Politics, Business Studies and Geography.
  • Economics can be useful if you are interested in a career in business, journalism, politics, finance and accounting, marketing, engineering or IT.

Engineering

AQA Level 3 Foundation Technical Level Engineering

Why study Engineering at The Sixth Form at Ridgewood?

What will I study in this subject?

  • You will complete four units over the 2 years and all of the units in this qualification are mandatory. These units are:
  • Unit 1 – Materials, Technology and Science (External examination – 1 Hour 45 minutes)
  • Unit 2 – Mechanical Systems (Externally set and externally assessed – 20 hours)
  • Unit 4 – Engineering Design (Internally assessed)
  • Unit 5 – Production and Manufacturing (Internally assessed)

What will my lessons and independent study involve?

  • Lessons within Engineering will consist of a range of teaching techniques that aim to stretch and challenge students within both a practical and a theoretical environment. Students are provided with all the resources required to support with the completion of internal assessments and these are all introduced in lessons prior to controlled assessment sessions.
  • Students are expected to carry out independent learning which will follow on from content given in lessons. Regular deadlines are set for students to meet to ensure that progress is driven and work is completed within the controlled assessment timings given by the examination board.

How will I be assessed?

  • You will complete four units over the 2 years and all of the units in this qualification are mandatory.
  • One of the units is examined and one is an externally marked practical assignment.
  • The other two units are internally set and marked by the tutor.

(See ‘What will I study in this subject?’ box for more information).

Is this the right course for me?

To be successful, you must be a strong independent learner who can analyse and decimate written and numerical information accurately. You need to relish the challenges of researching, conducting and analysing data from practical investigations, and enjoy working collaboratively. If you are keen to broaden your knowledge of engineering applications, or are interested in studying an engineering related degree at university, this course will suit you.

English Language

AQA A level English Language

Why study English Language at The Sixth Form at Ridgewood?

What will I study in this subject?

‘Language, the Individual and Society’ will introduce you to textual variations and representations, children’s language development (0-11 years) and methods of language analysis.

‘Language Diversity and Change’ will allow you to explore language diversity and change over time. You will study the key concepts of audience, purpose and mode as well as language in its wider social, geographical and temporal contexts.

‘Language in Action’ will allow you to explore and analyse language data independently and develop and reflect upon your writing expertise. This is a non-exam assessment where you will be expected to produce a language investigation (2,000 words excluding data) and a piece of original writing with commentary (750 words each).

What will my lessons and independent study involve?

  • Your English Language lessons will be seminar-style, meaning that you will engage in group discussions to further your understanding of the content. Furthermore, you will be required to work both in groups and individually to deliver presentations to the rest of your class.
  • Independent study is an essential part of the course and you will need to read around the subject and understand new vocabulary and language theories in order to apply them to exam questions.

How will I be assessed?

 Paper 1: Language, the Individual and Society

  • Written exam: 2 hours 30 minutes
  • 100 marks

Section A - Textual Variations and Representations

Section B - Child Language Development

 

Paper 2: Language Diversity and Change

  • Written exam: 2 hours 30 minutes
  • 100 marks
  • 40% of A level

Section A - Language Diversity and Change

Section B - Language Discourses

 

Non-exam assessment: Language in Action (20% of A level)

  • Language Investigation 2,000 words
  • Original Writing and commentary 1,500 words

Is this the right course for me?

You need to be able to analyse in depth and get to grips with a vast amount of linguistic terminology very quickly. You will also need to be proficient in written communication, expressing yourself in a logical, accurate and often creative manner. You should enjoy unpicking language, including grammar, and deciphering its meanings.

English Literature

AQA A level English Literature A

Why study English Literature at The Sixth Form at Ridgewood?

What will I study in this subject?

Paper 1: Love through the ages

Study of three texts: one poetry and one prose text, of which one must be written pre-1900, and one Shakespeare play.

  • William Shakespeare’s Othello - a timeless story about race, love, jealousy and betrayal.
  • F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby – the novel follows Jay Gatsby, a man who orders his life around one desire: to be reunited with Daisy Buchanan, the love he lost five years earlier.
  • AQA anthology of love poetry through the ages pre-1900 - this anthology allows students to encounter a range of different types of poem as they study representations of love over time.

 

Paper 2: Texts in shared contexts

Option 2A: WW1 and its aftermath

Study of three texts: one prose, one poetry, and one drama, of which one must be written post-2000.

  • Pat Barker’s Life Class ­- this novel is about students at the Slade School of Art in the first years of the twentieth century, one of whom volunteers to serve in a front line hospital during the First World War.
  • R.C. Sherriff’s Journey’s End - set in the trenches near Saint-Quentin, Aisne in 1918, towards the end of the First World War, Journey's End gives a glimpse into the experiences of the officers of a British Army infantry company.
  • Catherine Reilly’s poetry collection, Scars Upon My Heart - a poetry anthology which focuses upon poetry written by women during the First World War often from the wives and girlfriends who had loved ones serving in Europe as well as the poems from those who had lost loved ones.

What will my lessons and independent study involve?

Essay work is regularly required, though writing in this course will vary in length and style. Students will also be expected to research topics and give presentations to the other members of their class. They should be prepared to pursue their own reading interests and to read around the set texts, including reference to critical sources. Students are expected to work collaboratively and independently. Teachers use study methods that encourage students to develop their own informed responses to texts including, for example, literary debates and different drama activities.

How will I be assessed?

Paper 1: Love through the ages

  • Written exam: 3 hours
  • 75 marks
  • 40% of A level

Section A: William Shakespeare’s Othello: one passage-based question with linked essay (25 marks)

Section B: Unseen poetry: compulsory essay question on two unseen poems (25 marks)

Section C: Comparing texts: one essay question linking F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby and poems from the AQA anthology of love poetry through the ages pre-1900 (25 marks)

 

Paper 2: Texts in shared context

  • Written exam: 2 hours 30 minutes
  • 75 marks
  • 40% of A level

Section A: One essay question on Catherine Reilly’s poetry collection, Scars Upon My Heart (25 marks)

Section B: Contextual linking

  • one compulsory question on an unseen extract (25 marks)
  • one essay question linking Journey’s End and Life Class (25 marks)

 

Non-exam assessment: Independent critical study: texts across time

Comparative critical study of two texts, at least one of which must have been written pre-1900 One extended essay (2500 words) and a bibliography

  • 50 marks
  • 20% of A level
  • assessed by teachers
  • moderated by AQA

Is this the right course for me?

You need to enjoy reading for this course. You will have to read a vast range of texts independently. You should also be proficient at close analysis and essay writing. You will be required to research around the subject, engaging with critics and contextual factors that surround a text.

Geography

AQA A Level Geography

Why study Geography at The Sixth Form at Ridgewood?

  • Results in 2018 were extremely strong, with 45% of students achieving A*-B and 73% achieving A*-C.
  • Students on the course benefit from four compulsory days of fieldwork undertaken over the two years including a city trip, a coastal trip and a two day UK residential to complete the coursework element of the A level.
  • There have been many successful students who have gone on to study Geography-related degrees, including students recently securing places at the University of York.
  • Staff teaching the course have extensive and detailed subject knowledge, as well as a real passion for geography.

What will I study in this subject?

  • Physical Paper – Water and carbon cycles, Coastal systems and Landscapes and Hazards
  • Human Paper – Changing Places, Global systems and global governance and population and the environment

What will my lessons and independent study involve?

  • Students will experience a variety of lessons from classroom-based learning of geographical theories and processes to computer lessons using GIS software, and enquiry lessons investigating a range of geographical topics.
  • Students will be given independent study to complete. This will often involve reading such as geography-based journal and geo-files, or involve homework such as flipped learning, exam questions and the creation of retrieval/revision resources.

How will I be assessed?

  • At the end of Year 13, students will sit two exams, each 2.5 hours long.
  • Physical geography exam: 120 marks, 5 questions (2 of which are compulsory and one is chosen by the topic chosen by the teacher).
  • Human geography exam: 120 marks, 5 questions (2 of which are compulsory and one is chosen by the topic chosen by the teacher).
  • Exams make up 80% of the marks for the course.
  • The NEA element (non-examined assessment) is worth the remaining 20% and is an investigational research/data collection project based on one of the topics learnt within the specification. This is linked to the two day residential completed in Year 13.

Is this the right course for me?

  • Skills needed include a passion for the subject, good literacy and numeracy skills, an inquisitive outlook on your learning, and the ability to use a wide range of skills to link physical processes and human characteristics together synoptically.

Health and Social Care

Pearson BTEC Level 3 Health and Social Care National Extended Certificate/Diploma

Why study Health and Social Care at The Sixth Form at Ridgewood?

What will I study in this subject?

Extended Certificate

  • Human Lifespan Development – This unit covers physical, intellectual, emotional and social development across the human lifespan and the factors affecting the development and the effects of ageing.
  • Working in Health and Social Care – This unit explores what it is like to work in the health and social care sector, including roles and responsibilities of workers and organisations.
  • Meeting the Needs of Individual Care and Support Needs – The focus of this unit is on the principles and practicalities that underpin meeting individuals’ care and support needs, which are the foundation of all the care disciplines.
  • Supporting Individuals with Additional Needs – This unit explores the role of health and social care services in providing care and support to individual with additional needs.

Diploma

  • Human Lifespan Development – This unit covers physical, intellectual, emotional and social development across the human lifespan and the factors affecting the development and the effects of ageing.
  • Working in Health and Social Care – This unit explores what it is like to work in the health and social care sector, including roles and responsibilities of workers and organisations.
  • Enquiries into current Research in Health and Social Care – This unit will involve students investigating a current health issue and the purpose of research methods in health and social care.
  • Meeting the Needs of Individual Care and Support Needs – The focus of this unit is on the principles and practicalities that underpin meeting individuals’ care and support needs, which are the foundation of all the care disciplines.
  • Work Experience in Health and Social Care – This is a practical unit and is dependent upon student completing their internship in a health and social care setting.
  • Principle of Safe Practice in Health and Social Care – This unit explores safe practices in health and social care settings and identifies the complaints procedures and duty of care.
  • Promoting Public Health – This unit involves research of public health issues and how they are promoted in the UK.
  • Supporting Individuals with Additional Needs – This unit explores the role of health and social care services in providing care and support to individual with additional needs.

What will my lessons and independent study involve?

  • Learning in the classroom will be characterised by key activities which vary within each unit. Some lessons will involve specialist speakers, some will be teacher-led and some student-led.
  • Students will have the opportunity also to have some practical activities ranging from use of a wheelchair/walker/mobility aids to using interactive babies and having parents with their babies visit the school.
  • Students are expected to complete further independent study outside of lessons and the expectations for this would be at least additional hour for every hour studied in school.

How will I be assessed?

Extended Certificate

  • Over the two year course there are 2 external (exam) units and 2 internal (coursework) units.
  • Both exam units are 1.5 hours in length and are set and marked by Pearson.
  • Both internal units will be completed after the teaching both in and out of the classroom and marked by the teacher. Verification of the mark will be through the Pearson verification process.

Diploma

  • Over the 2 year course there are 2 external (exam) units, 1 controlled assessment and 5 internal (coursework) units.
  • The 2 exams units are 1.5 hours in length and are set and marked by Pearson.
  • The controlled assessment will be assessed in 2 parts and are set and marked by Pearson.
  • All the internal units will be completed after the teaching both in and out of the classroom and marked by the teacher and verification of the mark will be through the Pearson verification process.

Is this the right course for me?

  • Students need to have an understanding of, and an interest in, health and social care settings and work.
  • This is ideal for students who wish to go into a career in the caring profession, or may also be an option for those interested in pursuing a career as a doctor, dentist, care assistant or teacher.

History

AQA A Level History

Why study History at The Sixth Form at Ridgewood?

The average ALPs grade achieved by the department over the last four years has been a 4 (classified as ‘very good’).

You get to set your own coursework question, exploring a topic you hold a personal interest in. You will spend approximately six months researching into an issue or era of your choice and write an essay on it worth 20% of your A level grade. Our students always enjoy the freedom and flexibility the choice of coursework allows.

The course focuses on just two fascinating topics (inter-war Germany and the Tudors), so you will become an expert on two hugely important periods of history.

What will I study in this subject?

Germany, 1918-1939

  • What was life like in Germany before Hitler?
  • Why did Hitler come into power?
  • How did Hitler change Germany?

Tudor England, 1485-1603

  • What were the key actions of Henry VII, Henry VIII, Edward, Mary and Elizabeth?
  • How secure was the Tudor hold over England?
  • Did society improve under these monarchs?

What will my lessons and independent study involve?

Most lessons are spent discovering the engaging and interesting developments in Germany or England. There will be lots of discussion, debate and questioning during our time in class.

You will spend a lot of time looking at primary and secondary sources to see what they reveal about life during these periods and using your own knowledge to test whether the sources are accurate or reliable.

You will also have the chance to develop your extended essay writing skills

Most of your independent study will focus on reading around the topics to add detail to your notes or revising key content by creating summary resources and self-testing.

How will I be assessed?

Paper 1 – The Tudors: This will be a 2.5 hour exam and you will answer one source question and two write two essays. (40%)

Paper 2 – Germany: Again, this is a 2.5 hour exam and you will answer one source question and two write two essays. (40%)

Coursework: This is a 4,000 word project on a topic of your choice. (20%)

Is this the right course for me?

You will love History if you:

  • Are interested in pursuing a career in law, journalism, politics, business etc.
  • Like to conduct independent research into topics
  • Have a keen interest in one area / event / topic in History. This can be your coursework choice.
  • Enjoy reading
  • Like debating and class discussions.

IT

Cambridge Technicals Level 3 Extended Certificate in IT

Why study IT at The Sixth Form at Ridgewood?

IT is always a popular choice for our students because they enjoy the subject and know they can be successful in it. We are also extremely well resourced and have dedicated Computer Science suites in our Sixth Form building with dual screen monitors designed for programming. Topics are carefully matched to faculty staff with expertise in the subject area. 

IT assists in the development of transferrable skills such as communication and problem solving. The optional units we study encourage the development of time management, and research and analytical skills, as well as emphasising the need for good written and verbal communication.

What will I study in this subject?

There are 5 units:

Unit 1: Fundamentals of IT

In this unit you will learn a sound understanding of IT technologies and practices essential for IT professionals. Information learnt in this unit will provide a solid foundation in the fundamentals of hardware, networks, software, the ethical use of computers and how business uses IT. Knowledge gained in the study of this unit will also help prepare you for relevant industry qualifications such as CompTIA A+, CompTIA Mobility+ and Cisco IT Essentials.

 

Unit 2: Global Information

The skills gained by completing this unit will give you knowledge of the functionality of information and how data is stored and processed by organisations. You will also learn about how individuals use information of various types. Knowledge gained in the study of this unit will also help prepare you for relevant industry qualifications such as VM Ware.

 

Unit 3: Cyber Security

This unit has been designed to enable you to gain knowledge and understanding of the range of threats, vulnerabilities and risks that impact on both individuals and organisations. Learning within this unit will also support the delivery of the Cisco Cyber Security and CompTIA A+, CompTIA Security+, CompTIA Mobility+ qualifications as well as UK government cyber security initiatives.

 

Unit 17: Internet of Everything

This unit is about the use of the internet and how it is impacting people and society. You will learn about the Internet of Everything (IoE) and how it is used. Using your knowledge you will carry out a feasibility study for a potential idea. You will pitch your idea to potential stakeholders and use their feedback to revise your proposal. Knowledge gained in the study of this unit will also help prepare you for relevant industry qualifications such as Cisco IoE.

 

Unit 9: Product Development

The purpose of this unit is to prepare you to undertake product development activities. You

will learn about different product design methodologies and the role of the product development life cycle. The skills that you will learn can be applied to the development of any product, large or small.

What will my lessons and independent study involve?

Lessons will be 100% focused on the exam units in Year 12. You will be tested in mock exams throughout the year to prepare you for these. Year 13 will focus on the 3 units of coursework.

Independent study outside lessons will involve you revising from your revision folder and spending the time completing coursework required for the pre-set deadlines.

Extended writing work is required regularly in both theory and coursework lessons. You will also be expected to research topics and give presentations to the other members of the class. You are expected to keep up to date with current affairs relating to business and economics. Students will be expected to work collaboratively as well as independently. Teachers use study methods that encourage students to develop their own informed responses to texts including, for example, group interviews, presentations and also real life case studies.

How will I be assessed?

  • Unit 1: Fundamentals of IT
    • Hardware, Software, Networks, Communication, Issues
    • Exam – 1 hour 30 minutes (80 marks)
    • Section A: Multiple choice on any aspect of the unit (20 marks)
    • Section B: Evaluative writing questions on a case study for a given scenario (60 marks)
  • Unit 2: Global Information
    • Information, Data, Legislation, Security
    • Exam – 1 hour 30 minutes (80 marks)
    • Evaluative writing questions on a case study for a given scenario
  • Unit 3: Cyber Security
    • Cyber Security, Issues, Measures, Managing Incidents
    • Exam – 1 hour (60 marks)
    • Evaluative writing questions on a case study for a given scenario
  • Unit 17: Internet of Everything
    • The Internet of Everything, Repurposing technology, Presenting Ideas
    • Coursework
    • 5 Pass tasks, 3 Merit tasks, 2 Distinction tasks
  • Unit 9: Product Development
    • The Product Development Life Cycle, Designing Products, Implement and Test Products, Carry out Acceptance Testing
    • Coursework
    • 8 Pass tasks, 3 Merit tasks, 2 Distinction tasks

Is this the right course for me?

Students considering the course will need to be able to write extended, evaluative pieces of writing. In addition to this, students will also need to be able to learn a vast amount of technical terminology for each of the exams. This subject also requires a detailed understanding of computing and IT at a level that allows you to access professional qualifications from nationally recognised providers.

Mathematics

AQA A Level Mathematics

Why study Maths at The Sixth Form at Ridgewood?

What will I study in this subject?

  • Pure Mathematics - The use and application of algebra, trigonometry and other core mathematical skills.
  • Mechanics – An applied unit that focuses on the real world problems such as kinematics, forces and moments.
  • Statistics – An applied unit that focus on real life uses of mathematics to analyse data and trends focusing on topics such as sampling, hypothesis testing and probability.

What will my lessons and independent study involve?

  • Teaching in Maths consists of nine one hour lessons over two weeks.
  • Lessons usually consist of teacher-led examples followed by questions set for students to complete as individuals or as groups where appropriate.
  • Many lessons will be used to complete improvements on set independent learning or exam papers.
  • Students are set independent study to compliment what they have learnt in lesson and are expected to complete independent study on topics they need more practice on.
  • In general, students are set one hour of independent study for each hour of teaching.

How will I be assessed?

  • Three two hour exams at the end of Year 13.
  • Each exam consists of 100 marks and will make up one third of your overall grade.
  • Paper 1 will be Pure Maths (2 hours)
  • Paper 2 will be Pure and Mechanics (2 hours)
  • Paper 3 will be Pure and Statistics (2 hours)

Is this the right course for me?

  • This course is suitable for students with a passion for maths combined with the dedication to work hard in the subject.
  • Students should be organised, self-motivated learners who are willing to ask questions both in and outside of lesson time.

Mathematics (Further)

AQA A Level Further Mathematics

Why study Further Maths at The Sixth Form at Ridgewood?

  • You will achieve two A levels when studying this course, one in Maths and one in Further Maths.
  • We have a strong team of A level teachers who have been teaching the subject for many years and have a history of excellent A level results.
  • Students at Ridgewood have said that the support given to them by teachers is exemplary; we are always willing to spend time with students to help them if they are struggling.
  • Maths is one the most popular facilitating subject and it is essential for many higher education courses and careers.
  • In 2018, 100% of students achieved an A* or A grade.

What will I study in this subject?

Year 12:

  • You will complete the A level Maths course in Year 12. Please see the A level Maths Course Information sheet for more details.

Year 13:

  • You will complete the Further Maths course in Year 13. It will consist of a pure module and a choice of two from three applied modules.
  • Pure Mathematics – a more advanced version of the A level course which introduces some new topics and expands on the topics taught in the A level Maths course.

       Pick two from the following three options:

  • Mechanics
  • Statistics
  • Discrete

What will my lessons and independent study involve?

  • Teaching in Further Maths consists of 18 one hour lessons over two weeks.
  • Lessons usually consist of teacher-led examples followed by questions set for students to complete as individuals or as groups where appropriate.
  • Many lessons will be used to complete improvements on set independent learning or exam papers.
  • Students are set independent study to compliment what they have learnt in lesson and are expected to complete independent study on topics they need more practice on.
  • In general, students are set one hour of independent study for each hour of teaching.

How will I be assessed?

For the A level In Maths:

  • Three two hour exams at the end of Year 12.
  • Each exam consists of 100 marks and will make up one third of your overall grade.
  • Paper 1 will be Pure Maths (2 hours)
  • Paper 2 will be Pure and Mechanics (2 hours)

Paper 3 will be Pure and Statistics (2 hours)

For the A level in Further Maths:

  • Three two hour exams at the end of Year 13.
  • Each exam consists of 100 marks and will make up one third of your overall grade.
  • Paper 1 will be Pure Maths (2 hours)
  • Paper 2 will be Pure Maths (2 hours)
  • Paper 3 will be a mixture of the two applied options

Is this the right course for me?

  • This course is suitable for students with a passion for maths combined with the dedication to work hard in the subject.
  • Students should be thoroughly interested in maths and its applications as it will take up half of your study time at the Sixth Form.
  • Students should be organised, self-motivated learners who are willing to ask questions both in and outside of lesson time.

Performing Arts

Edexcel BTEC National Extended Certificate in Performing Arts Level 3

Why study BTEC National Extended Certificate in Performing Arts at The Sixth Form at Ridgewood?

What will I study in this subject?

  • Unit 1: Investigating Practitioners’ Work

In Unit 1 you will explore the work of two influential practitioners in response to a set task from the exam board. You will identify cultural factors that influence their work such as creative intentions, performance, production and range of repertoire to make independent judgements.

  • Unit 2: Developing Skills and Techniques for Performance

In Unit 2 you will develop your performance skills through a range of workshops and classes to develop the necessary interpretative, technical and acting skills.

  • Unit 3: Group Performance Workshop

In Unit 3, you are provided with a given stimulus and through discussion, research and practical exploration will create a performance in response to the stimulus that will be presented to a live audience.

  • Unit 19: Acting Styles

In Unit 19 you will practically explore a range of acting styles used by a range of theatre practitioners. You will research and discuss the chosen practitioner’s techniques and review your progress in supporting your development as a performer.

  • Unit 27: Musical Theatre Techniques

In this unit you will explore a range of different musical theatre styles through research as well as exploring practically the skills required for development as a musical theatre performer. This is suitable for you if you have a passion for musical theatre vocals.

What will my lessons and independent study involve?

  • A typical lesson in BTEC Performing Arts will be a mixture of practical exploration and discussion. You will be expected to make notes on the practical work and reflect on your development as a performer.
  • It is an expectation that you will complete research and exploration of theatre practitioners and styles outside of lesson. This may include reading extracts of plays, reading reports or journals on material or even watching performances through our theatre subscription packages.

How will I be assessed?

  • Units 2, 19 and 27 are all internally assessed. This means you will submit a range of written and practical work that your teacher will mark.
  • Unit 1 and 3 are externally assessed. For Unit 1 you will be set a question by the exam board and will have a four week period to research and prepare work for the exam. The exam will then take place for 3 hours after this research period.  For Unit 3 you will be set a stimulus by the board and will complete milestone log entries of your development and exploration of your performance as well as an evaluation. All of this, including the performance, will be sent to an external examiner.

Is this the right course for me?

  • It is essential that you have a passion for the performing arts and the willingness to contribute to enrichment and trips in the subject area.
  • You must be confident in performing in front of others and committed to after school rehearsals for performance pieces.

Physics

AQA A Level Physics

Why study Physics at The Sixth Form at Ridgewood?

If you choose to study Physics at A level, you will get to explore the fundamental nature of almost everything that we know of.  Physicists explore the entire universe by probing the smallest pieces of matter. By taking A level Physics, you will be starting your journey into a world deep beneath the surface of what you can actually see.

One of our largest faculties, the Science team boasts fifteen teachers and three technicians. Within this team we have three highly qualified specialised Physics teachers. Their backgrounds and expertise cover a wide breadth of areas including engineering, and nuclear and thermal physics. We have three specialist post-16 laboratories in Faraday where the majority of teaching takes place, one for each of Biology, Chemistry and Physics. There is also an additional STEM room (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics). Our A level Physics laboratory is highly resourced with practical equipment that you will use frequently during your studies.

Former alumni of the Physics department at Ridgewood have progressed to study Medicine, Astrophysics, Radiography, Physics, Mathematics, Mechanical Engineering, Chemical engineering, Computer science and Aeronautical engineering. 

What will I study in this subject?

First year of A level

Second year of A level

 

  1. Measurements and their errors
  2. Particles and radiation
  3. Waves
  4. Mechanics and energy
  5. Electricity

 

  1. Further mechanics and thermal physics
  2. Fields
  3. Nuclear physics

 

Plus one option from the following –

Astrophysics

Medical physics

Engineering physics

Turning points in physics

Physics, like all sciences, is a practical subject. Throughout the course you will carry out practical activities including:

• investigating interference and diffraction of laser light

• measuring acceleration due to gravity

• investigating systems that oscillate

• investigation of the links between temperature, volume and pressure

• safe use of ionising radiation

• investigating magnetic fields.

These practical activities will enable you to develop key investigative skills. Importantly, if you choose to study a Physics-based degree at university, you’ll have the practical skills and confidence needed to carry out successful experiments.

What will my lessons and independent study involve?

Physics lessons at Ridgewood will contain a variety of different tasks to suit all learners’ needs. examples of tasks completed on a daily basis include:

  • Fact recall quizzes
  • Hands on practical activities
  • Paired discussions
  • Group work
  • Research tasks
  • Teacher led worked examples
  • Teacher led lecture style delivery of content
  • Exam question practice and guidance
  • Opportunity to ask questions

We also strive to give students regular written feedback on classwork so that you know exactly how to improve and achieve a better grade.

Independent study time will also contain a variety of tasks including the following:

  • Making revision resources
  • Enhancing key notes
  • Answering questions
  • Researching practical activities
  • Researching content prior to the lesson it is to be taught
  • Completing exam paper practice
  • Responding to your teacher’s marking and feedback

How will I be assessed?

There is no coursework. However, your performance during practical investigations will be assessed. There are three, 2 hour exams at the end of the two year linear A level course.  At least 15% of the exam marks are based on what you learned during practical investigations and at least 40% of the marks assess mathematical skills equivalent to Level 2 or above.

Is this the right course for me?

You can study A level Physics with either separate or combined sciences at GCSE, but speak to your science teacher about whether it is the right choice for you. You need to enjoy the mix of theoretical and practical work. It links well with other sciences and maths. Physics can be useful if you are interested in studying a science-based degree at university.

Politics

Edexcel A Level Politics

Why study Politics at The Sixth Form at Ridgewood?

Students who take Politics invariably develop a lifelong passion for the subject. For example, 50% of the students who took their exams in 2018 went on to study Politics or a related course at university.

Results in the department have been very strong over time. Over the past four years, we have averaged an ALPs grade 4 (classified as “very good”). Over two thirds of the results students achieved in 2018 were either at A or B grade.

There are lots of enrichment opportunities on offer. As our local MP, Ed Miliband is a regular visitor, attending on three occasions last year to work with Sixth Form Politics students. We also had a talk from a sitting member of the House of Lords and multiple other visitors from the local area including the CEO of the Doncaster Chamber of Commerce.

Studying Politics enables students to cover fascinating topics relevant to today’s world.

What will I study in this subject?

Paper 1 – UK Politics:

  • Democracy and Participation (how can people influence politics?)
  • Political Parties (what do different parties stand for?)
  • Electoral Systems
  • Voting Behaviour and the Media (what affects the way people choose to vote?)
  • Core Political Ideas (Conservatism, Liberalism and Socialism)

Paper 2 – UK Government

  • The Constitution (how has the political system changed over time?)
  • Parliament (how effective are the Commons and the Lords?)
  • The Prime Minister (how powerful is this role?)
  • The relationship between the PM, Parliament and Courts
  • Anarchism

Paper 3 – Comparative Politics (USA)

  • The Constitution (what sort of America did the Founding Fathers want?)
  • US Congress (how is Congress different from Parliament?)
  • Presidency (how is Trump different from May?)
  • Supreme Court (what powers does this institution hold to change America?)
  • Democracy and Participation (how can people influence politics?)

What will my lessons and independent study involve?

  • Our lessons are like ‘seminar workshops’ at university
  • There is a lot of discussion and debate around complex political issues
  • We access contemporary and historical texts
  • You will also have the chance to develop your extended essay writing skills
  • Independent study work will focus on wider-reading around the topic we look at in class, building up a revision fact-file, and constantly self-testing on important content.

How will I be assessed?

There will be three terminal examinations at the end of Year 13, with no coursework:

Paper 1) UK Politics – 2 hours

Paper 2) UK Government – 2 hours

Paper 3) Comparative Politics (USA) – 2 hours

Is this the right course for me?

You will love Politics if you:

  • Enjoy reading
  • Like to write extended essays
  • Watch the news, or are interested in current affairs
  • Are considering a career in politics, law, journalism, business, teaching etc.
  • Are prepared to spend a considerable amount of time self-testing on important information.

Product Design

AQA A Level Design and Technology: Product Design

Why study Product Design at The Sixth Form at Ridgewood?

What will I study in this subject?

You will complete three units over the two years.  This qualification is linear so you will sit all your exams and submit all your non-exam assessment at the end of the course.

The units you will study are:

Unit 1 – Technical Principles.

Unit 2 - Designing and making principles - split into 2 areas: Product Analysis and Commercial Manufacture.

Unit 3 – NEA (Non-examined Assessment): Practical application of technical principles, designing and making principles. Written or digital design portfolio and photographic evidence of final prototype.

What will my lessons and independent study involve?

  • Lessons will consist of a range of teaching techniques that aim to stretch and challenge students in both a practical and a theoretical environment. Students are provided with all the resources required to support with the completion of internal coursework element as well as having theory lessons in order to prepare for the exams.
  • Students are expected to carry out independent learning which will follow on from content given in lessons. Regular deadlines are set for students to meet to ensure that progress is driven and work is completed within the NEA timings given by the examination board.

How will I be assessed?

  • You will complete three units over the two years

Unit 1 – Technical Principles. (2 hours and 30 minutes written paper)

  • 120 marks
  • 30% of A-level

Unit 2 - Designing and making principles (1 hour and 30 minutes)

  • 80 marks
  • 20% of A-level

Split into 2 areas

  • Product Analysis: 30 marks
  • Commercial Manufacture: 50 marks

Unit 3 – NEA (Non-examined Assessment): Practical application of technical principles, designing and making principles. This will be a substantial design and make project.

Is this the right course for me?

To be successful, you must be a strong independent learner who can analyse and decimate written and numerical information accurately. You should enjoy both the practical and the theory element of the subject.  You will enjoy designing and problem solving as well as having an interest in evolving technologies.

Psychology

AQA A Level Psychology

Why study Psychology at The Sixth Form at Ridgewood?

The AQA (Specification A) Psychology course at Ridgewood Sixth Form has been designed to introduce the nature of psychology as a science. You will have the opportunity to discover psychological approaches, consider issues and debate throughout your studies. The course provides an emphasis on applying knowledge from a range of topics such as attachment, biopsychology and forensic psychology.

Last summer, the Sociology and Psychology departments teamed up to organise a trip to the Nottingham Courts of Justice. This trip was so successful that we are hoping to run it again in summer 2019. The trip involved two interactive workshops and our psychology students particularly enjoyed the courtroom workshop where they were able to piece together a defence for a case of diminished responsibility. This had a specific focus for our students as it enabled a case to be assembled regarding schizophrenia and preventable violent behaviour.

At Ridgewood Sixth Form, Psychology is one of our most popular subjects. Our students comment on their enjoyment of lessons and the approachable nature of their teachers. Lessons take a variety of forms with an emphasis on developing evaluation skills and tying together knowledge from each topic. A particular strength for Psychology is the success of our previous year groups; we attribute their results to their interest in the course, the availability of quality resources and the interactive and enjoyable lessons.

What will I study in this subject?

Topics you will study include social influence, memory, attachment, psychopathology, approaches, biopsychology, research methods, issues and debates, relationships, schizophrenia and forensic psychology.

·         Social influence: the types and explanations of conformity, reasons why people obey and how a minority can cause social change.

·         Memory: how the brain processes information and stores memories, why we forget things and how to improve eye witness testimony.

·         Attachment: care-giver and infant interactions, the role of the father and animal studies into attachment.

·         Psychopathology: understanding, explaining and how to treat phobias, OCD and depression.

·         Approaches: the ways the human mind is studied and the effective therapies that have been developed as a result.

·         Biopsychology: understanding the role of neurons, the structure and function of the brain and the role that biological rhythms play in determining human behaviours.

·         Research methods: learning about the methods used to gain insight into human behaviour, designing and evaluating research studies with the aim of improving them.

·         Issues and debates: identifying the gender, culture and ethical issues experienced in research and contemplating the main debates regarding free will and determined factors.

·         Relationships: understanding factors affecting romantic relationships, how to maintain relationships, why relationships come to an end and how the internet is changing the nature of relationships.

·         Schizophrenia: explaining where schizophrenia originates from, how to treat schizophrenia effectively and how it can be managed in mental health institutions.

·         Forensic psychology: defining and explaining why criminal behaviours occur, how to treat criminal behaviour and manage it within prison.

What will my lessons and independent study involve?

Psychology lessons are designed to be challenging. In most lessons you will consider a brand-new explanation or treatment and be asked to evaluate whether these have served their purpose based on evidence. Therefore, debate is necessary to create balanced and well-reasoned arguments and our lessons reflect this. In addition, careful consideration of research methods is necessary in every lesson to encourage you to present alternative ideas for conducting valid research.

Independent study involves a range of activities; we often direct students to read ahead of lessons, complete exam style questions and create detailed essay plans and work towards detailed and well-planned revision.

How will I be assessed?

There is no coursework included in the Psychology A level but there are 3 exams at the end of Year 13.

Each exam is 2 hours long, with a total of 96 marks per paper (33.3% of your overall A level grade per paper). All exams contain multiple choice questions, short answer questions worth 4, 6, 8 or 10 marks and extended writing questions worth 16 marks.

·         Paper 1 – Social Influence, memory, attachment and psychopathology.

·         Paper 2 – Approaches, biopsychology and research methods.

·         Paper 3 – Issues and debates, relationships, schizophrenia and forensic psychology.

Is this the right course for me?

Students considering the course will need to be able to analyse theories, methods and treatments for various disorders, and are required to know and apply these in detail through your written communication. Sound essay writing skills and the ability to elaborate are also crucial. You will also need to keep organised folders, notes and manage your revision. The ability to study independently whilst considering your own strengths and weaknesses to quickly improve on you work is important.

The Psychology course is suited to students who are interested in teaching or becoming a healthcare professional, as well as for those considering working within the business sector and human resources, working with children and adults with mental health concerns, and within the justice system. Psychology at Ridgewood Sixth Form is often a brand-new subject for many of our students so prior knowledge is not mandatory. Students who are organised, self-disciplined and hard-working will suit the course well.

Religious Studies

OCR A Level Religious Studies

Why study Philosophy and Ethics (Religious Studies) at The Sixth Form at Ridgewood?

·         Ridgewood Sixth Form is a great place to study A level Religious Studies for many reasons. The results achieved by the department are rated as an ALPS 3 (‘Excellent’), in 2018 all students achieved their target grades, 100% of grades were at least a C grade, and 80% of grades were A*-B.

·         Whilst studying Religious Studies at A level you also have access to excellent teacher support with a dedicated team of specialists with a wealth of experience and very strong subject knowledge.

·         Studying Religious Studies A level has many other benefits such as developing your evaluation and debating skills as well as critical thinking, research, interpretation, presentation and communication.

What will I study in this subject?

Philosophy of religion

·         Ancient philosophical influences (Plato and Aristotle’s views on truth and the nature of reality)

·         The nature of the soul, mind and body

·         Arguments about the existence of God (Ontological Argument, Cosmological Argument and Teleological Argument)

·         The nature and impact of Religious Experience

·         The challenge for religious belief of the Problem of evil

·         Ideas about the nature of God (what is God like, how should we talk about him)

·         Issues in Religious Language (How do we talk about God meaningfully)

Religion and ethics

·         Normative ethical theories (theories which tell us how to make moral decisions, including Situation Ethics, Utilitarianism, Natural Moral Law, Kant’s Ethics)

·         The application of ethical theory to two contemporary issues of importance (Euthanasia and Business Ethics)

·         Ethical language and thought (How do we use language meaningfully in Ethics)

·         Debates surrounding the significant idea of Conscience

·         Sexual ethics and the influence on ethical thought of developments in religious beliefs

Developments in Christian Thought

·         Augustine’s Teaching on Human Nature (how Augustine’s views on Human Nature have been affected by his Christian beliefs and life)

·         Death and the Afterlife

·         Knowledge of God’s Existence (how can we know God meaningfully)

·         The person of Jesus Christ

·         Christian moral principles (how Christians make their moral decisions)

·         Christian moral action (the action taken by Bonhoeffer based on his Christian beliefs)

·         Religious pluralism and theology and Religious pluralism and society (how should a Religious Society function and Christian views on a Religiously plural society)

·         Gender and society  and Gender and theology (issues of Gender within both society and Christianity)

·         The Challenge of Secularism (how religion is challenged in modern society by Secular and Atheistic views)

·         Liberation Theology and Marx (how Christian beliefs on Liberation Theology and treatment of the poor can be linked to the views on Marx and Communism)

What will my lessons and independent study involve?

·         Learning in A level Religious Studies lessons will be varied and include discussion and debate, opportunities for independent study and research and wider reading.

·         You will be required to complete independent study for this subject but it will always be focusing on ensuring you gain the highest grades. Examples include wider reading and critique of philosophical and ethical texts, research projects, revision and exam preparation, and evaluative style essay questions.

How will I be assessed?

·         The course is 100% written exams which are all sat at the end of Year 13.

·         There are three exams in total, each out of 120 marks and each 2 hours in length.

·         In each exam you will choose to answer 3 of a possible 4 evaluative essay questions.

Is this the right course for me?

·         You need to engage in wider reading and research outside of the classroom, engendering your love of learning and philosophical issues.

·         Critical and evaluative skills are a must for studying A level Religious Studies, as well as a keen interest in Philosophical and Ultimate questions of religious, philosophical and ethical content.

·         The course is suited to any student who has an inquisitive mind, enjoys debating philosophical and ethical issues and who enjoys extended writing and reading.  

Sociology

AQA A Level Sociology

Why study Sociology at The Sixth Form at Ridgewood?

This qualification offers an engaging and effective introduction to Sociology. The A level Sociology course at Ridgewood allows students the opportunity to learn about a variety of fascinating topics including Education, Families and Households, Beliefs in Society, and Crime and Deviance. Students at Ridgewood have enjoyed studying this selection of topics because of the variety that the AQA course offers.

Last summer, the Sociology and Psychology departments teamed together to organise a trip to the Nottingham Courts of Justice. This trip was so successful that we are hoping to run it again in summer 2019. The trip involved two interactive workshops: one where students were able to take part in a courtroom workshop and piece together a defence for a case of diminished responsibility, and an activity which comprised of students having access to historical case evidence on a “Brides in the Bathtub” murder inquiry.

At Ridgewood you will enjoy each and every lesson in Sociology. The team is committed to making sure lessons are not only geared to your needs but are engaging and challenging too. A particular strength of Sociology A level at Ridgewood is the wealth of resources and subject knowledge your teachers possess.

Our students would also happily agree that the teachers you will have at Ridgewood are friendly, will stop at nothing to help you and above all else pride themselves on being approachable.

What will I study in this subject?

Topics you will study include: Education, Families and Households, Theory and Methods, Crime and Deviance, and Beliefs in Society.

·         Education: the role and function of the education system and the differences in attainment across groups of individuals such as different ethnicities, genders and social classes.

·         Families and Households: the changing patterns of marriage, cohabitation, separation, divorce, childbearing, including the sociology of personal life, and the diversity of contemporary family and household structures.

·         Theory and Methods: the theoretical, practical and ethical considerations influencing the choice of topic, choice of methods to be used in sociology research and how to conduct research effectively.

·         Crime and Deviance: the distribution of crime and deviance by ethnicity, gender and social class, including recent patterns and trends in crime.

·         Beliefs in society: religious organisations, including cults, sects, denominations, churches and New Age movements, and their relationship to religious and spiritual belief and practice.

What will my lessons and independent study involve?

In Sociology, lessons are typically designed to encourage debate amongst the class members. Debate often will inform your essays and the evaluation you make about the methods used or the topic studied. For example, during your study of the research methods topic, we enjoy conducting research using any participants we can access at the time (in an ethical and appropriate manner). This often helps our students to easily see the issues with the methods they have been given to use and will help to improve the quality of evaluation.

Independent study involves a range of activities; we often direct students to read ahead of lessons, complete summary questions and create detailed essay plans.

How will I be assessed?

There is no coursework included in the Sociology A level but there are three exams at the end of Year 13. Each exam will be 2 hours with a total of 80 marks per paper (33.3% of your overall A level grade per paper). All exams contain short answer questions worth 4, 6 or 10 marks and extended writing questions worth 20 and 30 marks.

·         Paper 1 – Education with Theory and Methods

·         Paper 2 – Families and Households with Beliefs in Society

·         Paper 3 – Crime and Deviance with Theory and Methods

Is this the right course for me?

Students considering the course will need to be able to analyse theories and methods and be able to explain these in detail via written communication. In addition, students will also need to be able to learn vast amount of theories and research in order to back up points that are made in each essay.

The Sociology course is suited to students who are interested in the welfare system, interested in teaching, childcare or the healthcare profession, or in nursing and midwifery.  Above all, we require students who are excited about learning about sociology and the topics on offer. Even if it is all completely new to you, you are going to love Sociology!

Spanish

AQA A Level Spanish

Why study Spanish at The Sixth Form at Ridgewood?

Ridgewood Sixth Form is a great place to study Spanish at A level because you will be taught in a small class, led by a language specialist. Due to the small number of students, it is possible to tailor lessons to individual needs and weekly after-school intervention sessions are open to anyone who feels they may need a little bit more support.

Lessons are varied and consist of a range of activities, with students learning about both the Spanish language and Hispanic culture in Spain and Latin America. Over the two year course, we cover everything from politics to history, and from fashion to music. We also take an in-depth look at a book and film.

Spanish is the most widely spoken language in the world, making this a fantastic course for anyone who thinks they would like to travel in the future, or simply for those who are interested in learning in detail about another culture.

What will I study in this subject?

In the first year, students will undertake modules looking at technology, art, architecture, gender equality, Spanish traditions, music and film

In the second year of the course, we will look a closer look at immigration, racism, politics and the history of both Spain and Latin America. This year, students will also study a piece of literature in preparation for the writing exam.

What will my lessons and independent study involve?

In lessons, students practise all the skills needed to succeed in this subject, from reading and writing to grammar and translation. Students will also have a weekly speaking lesson, which may either be with the whole class or in smaller groups, to build confidence. Once a fortnight, we carry out a lesson in one of our IT suites to give students the chance to build on their listening skills.

Outside the classroom, students will be expected to learn vocabulary for a weekly test and carry out other activities to consolidate their learning. This may take the form of translation, grammar or research for a presentation. Alongside this, we recommend that our students listen to and watch a wide range of Spanish sources, such as music and film.

How will I be assessed?

Assessment consists of three exams, all of which are sat at the end of the two-year course. These are:

·         A combined listening, reading, writing and translation exam

·         A writing exam based on a text and film

·         A short speaking exam, based on course material and a research project

Is this the right course for me?

To be successful at A level, you will have to be prepared to dedicate at least four hours a week to independent study. On top of this, and during holidays, you will need to carry out additional study, which could consist of anything from watching a Spanish TV series to reading the news online or practising extended writing.

Sport and Physical Activity

Cambridge Technicals Extended Certificate in Sport and Physical Activity

Why study Sport and Physical Activity at The Sixth Form at Ridgewood?

·         The faculty benefits from excellent teachers with strong subject knowledge in the different areas of study including sports science, sports psychology, sports development and coaching.

·         We have great links with Loughborough University where our students bi-annually visit the Sports Science facilities.

·         We offer a variety of extra-curricular opportunities including football, basketball and netball.

·         You can complete the Sports Leaders qualification alongside your studies.

·         Ridgewood Sixth Form offers outstanding facilities including a brand new 3G pitch.

·         You have the option to study the diploma (equivalent to 2 A Levels).

·         Alumni of the PE Faculty have gone on to study a wealth of related degrees including Sports Journalism, Physiotherapy, and Sport and Exercise Science.

What will I study in this subject?

·         Body systems and the effects of physical activity (exam assessed)

·         Sports coaching and activity leadership

·         Sports organisation and development

·         Performance analysis in sport and exercise

·         Sports injuries and rehabilitation

What will my lessons and independent study involve?

The lessons vary from unit to unit and will include

·         Theory lessons

·         Coursework completion sessions

·         Practical lessons

·         Independent study and research projects

How will I be assessed?

·         42% exam

*  Body systems and the effects of physical activity – Exam (January): 1 hour 30 minutes

*  Sports organisation and development – Exam (May): 1 hour

·         58% coursework

*  Sports coaching and activity leadership - Coursework

*  Performance analysis in sport and exercise - Coursework

*  Sports injuries and rehabilitation - Coursework

Is this the right course for me?

·         This course is suitable for anyone who has an interest in sport and coaching and particularly a practical interest in coaching.

·         You must be interested in learning about the human body and performance in physical activity, and interested in developing your confidence in practical situations such as interviews, delivering PowerPoint presentations and working with others.

·         It is essential that you are intrinsically motivated to ensure coursework is completed on time and to the best of your ability.

·         This course is right for you if you are interested in a career in sports coaching, physiotherapy, sports science, PE teaching, sports management, sports development, personal training, as a gym instructor and many more.